BFG’s Nicholas Scheibner Quoted in The New York Times

“5 Steps to Take if the Bull Market Run Has You Thinking of Unloading Stocks”, an article written by Tara Siegel Bernard in the Aug. 22, 2018 edition of The New York Times, discusses the extended bull market that we are currently experiencing and what, if anything, we should do differently with our investments.  According to Baron Financial Group’s, Nicholas Scheibner, CFP®,

Many people feel that they only have two options: Invest or not invest,” said Nicholas Scheibner, a financial planner with Baron Financial Group. “However, you have a third option — adjust.”

 Read the entire New York Times article here

Please reach out to the Baron Team for a second opinion on your portfolio.

The Importance of a “Trusted Contact”

A 30-second read by the Baron Team:  Increasingly, we understand that there can be a need to have an additional person like a trusted family member or friend we can contact to ensure the well-being of a client.  As we age, we may start to see that a person’s mindfulness and mental capacity diminishes.  For some, early-onset dementia or other illness necessitates having a trusted contact in place at an earlier age.  In those instances, who can you trust to be contacted on your behalf, if necessary? 

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Should You Reduce the Amount of Stocks in Your Portfolio When You Retire?

A 60-second read by Nicholas Scheibner: The theory of, “reduce my risk as I near retirement” has been a long-standing investment mantra for many years.  However, a reduction in risk at retirement age may not be the best course of action for every investor. The theory of reduction in risk as you near retirement needs to be looked at more closely. 

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Things to Consider If You Have Over-Contributed to an IRA

A 60-second read by Victor Cannillo:

#1 – We highly recommend you hire a Certified Public Accountant to help you resolve the issue.

Here are some points to consider:

  • There are limitations on the total amount that may be contributed to an IRA. Currently, it’s the greater of either $5,500 ($6,500 if the person is 50 or older) or your taxable compensation for the year.

  • The IRS considers each individual person to have a single IRA.  The maximum contribution limits apply to all of your IRA accounts.  If you have more than one IRA account open, you can contribute to one account or all of your accounts as long as the total contributions meet the yearly limit.

  • If there are excess contributions to your IRAs, there is an annual additional 6% tax penalty (paid with the filing of Form 5329) on those excess contributions until you withdraw them from your account.

  • Normally, if the excess contribution for the tax year is withdrawn with any related earnings before the tax return deadline (including extensions), you are not subject to the 6% additional tax. Also the earnings on the excess IRA contributions as determined by the custodian will be subject to tax for the year the excess contribution was made. Those earnings are also subject to a 10% early withdrawal penalty if the person’s age is under 59 and a half for the year of the contribution.

  • You will need to consult a Certified Public Accountant to determine what tax returns need to be filed.

If you have more specific questions on this matter, we recommend speaking with a tax professional.

For any other questions, please reach out to your Baron Team.

Class of 2018: It Isn’t Too Early to Start Thinking about Your Retirement

A 60-second read by the Baron Team:  Congratulations 2018 College graduates! Throw that mortarboard as high in the air as you can and before it circles back down to earth, start thinking about saving for your retirement. You are most likely going to be responsible for setting yourself up for a successful retirement, so your best bet is to invest early and often.

Invest in yourself first. Most people think investing is the key to wealth, but while certainly important, you have to have some money first to invest. So as soon as you begin your first job out of school, start saving a minimum of 10% of your annual income for retirement. This will ensure that you invest in yourself first.  You should plan on saving this much or more for the rest of your working career.

Here is a behavior trick to help you accumulate savings: have money taken out of your paycheck automatically and deposited into a 401(k), 403(b), thrift savings plan, or other retirement account. Read our previous post on “What is the Best IRA for a Young Investor?”. Almost all employers offer retirement investment vehicles like these, where you can contribute a certain percentage of your salary for the future. What you put into the account will grow tax deferred and be earmarked specifically for retirement. Because your contributions are automatically saved, it forces you to invest, which you might not otherwise do, and the money will be spent. Consider the IRS’s system of collecting taxes throughout the year through tax withholding. They know that if it was up to us to save and pay them one big check at the end of the year, we would have already spent the money.  The same is true with investing. If a percent is taken out of every check directly, you won’t miss it. This is all part of behavioral finance, or the study of human behavior in financial decision-making. A fascinating field that we wealth advisors see play out on a daily basis.

Another behavioral finance mental trick is to keep three to six months of living expenses in a separate account from your checkbook, also known as an emergency fund. This will provide you with peace-of-mind to always know that no matter what bills come in or what happens in your career, you’ve got this safety-net of cash at your disposal that you can tap into. Keep the money liquid by putting it in a savings account or money market mutual fund. This will help protect you from those potential future financial downturns.

As always, if you have any further questions, don’t hesitate to contact the Baron Financial Group Team.