NJ Tax Payers: Make Sure You Always Claim Your Medical Expenses

A 30-second read by Nicholas Scheibner:  New Jersey is certainly not known as a “tax-friendly” state.  However, the garden state has a much lower threshold on medical-expense deductions than the federal government. New Jersey allows certain non-reimbursed medical expenses to be deducted after they exceed only 2% of your gross income

A few examples of things you should make sure you keep track of throughout the year:

  • Medicare Insurance Premiums
  • Dental Insurance Premiums
  • Doctor Co-pays
  • Out-of-pocket Prescription Costs
  • Eyeglasses and Vision Exams

This is commonly overlooked by taxpayer’s who do not itemize their deductions.  However, if you make $60,000 gross income per year, 2% is only $1,200.  For most people, their medical expenses will exceed that 2% as long as they keep track of all of them.

As always, if you have any further questions, don’t hesitate to contact the Baron Financial Group Team.

Disclosure: This material is not intended to be relied upon as a forecast, research, tax or investment advice.  Please consult your financial planning and tax professional for personal advice.

Is Pet Insurance Right for You and Your Furry Friend?

A 60-second read by Victor Cannillo:  For many of us, our four-legged companions have become a part of our families. Perhaps you have thought about whether pet insurance is something you should consider for your pet, but don’t know much about it.

Below we outline a brief summary of pet insurance to help you determine whether it might be right for you and your furry friend.

Continue reading “Is Pet Insurance Right for You and Your Furry Friend?”

What is the Benefit of Umbrella Insurance & How Do I Get It?

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published March 29, 2016. The information is still current as of this date.

A 60-second read by the Baron Team: You probably have homeowner’s insurance for your home and car insurance for your vehicle, but do you have umbrella insurance? In a society where many of us are concerned about personal liability and the possibility of being sued rightly or wrongly, the more assets you accumulate the more important personal liability protection becomes.

Continue reading “What is the Benefit of Umbrella Insurance & How Do I Get It?”

Nanny Tax: What You Need to Know When You Hire a Household Employee

A 60-second read by the Baron Team: 

  • Nanny taxes are taxes paid to the government from a person working in and/or around your home. These jobs can include nanny, housekeeper, gardener, chef, personal assistant or caregiver.
  • The worker is considered a household employee if the employer controls what work is done and how it is done and can be full time or part time work.
  • If you pay someone that works in your home $2,100 or more a year or $1,000 in a quarter they are considered a household employee.
  • The employer must obtain the employee’s name and social security number.
  • The employer must withhold a certain amount of compensation from a household employee for FICA and Medicare.
  • As well as withholding a certain amount of money from your household employee, you must also pay your share of FICA employer taxes and federal and state unemployment taxes.
  • The employee, as well as the employer, can benefit from filing these taxes. The employee can prove she/he was working for a set amount of time and qualify for certain government benefits, such as social security and unemployment.

  • Forms Required to file:
    1. Form SS-4 to obtain your federal Employer Identification Number, which is needed for the other forms.
    2. Form I-9 is needed to be filled out by your employee to verify she/he is eligible to work in the United States.
    3. W-4 Forms are used to determine what taxes are needed to be deducted from the household employee’s wages and sent to the IRS.
    4. Schedule H Form is part of your personal return with Form 1040 & an accountant can help determine the amount the employer is taxed for FICA and unemployment.

  • Insurance requirements:
    1. You must register for unemployment insurance in your residing state.
    2. You also need to have workers compensation insurance, which is very important.
      • If you reside in NY, you will also need to purchase a separate disability policy.

  • State taxes are generally paid quarterly while Federal taxes are paid annually.
  • If you refuse to file the proper tax documents you may be subjected to an audit from the IRS leading to tax evasion. Trying to classify your household employee as an “independent contractor” is a red flag to the IRS and should be avoided.

For more information on hiring household employees visit:  https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/hiring-household-employees

For more information on what forms are needed for hiring employees visit: https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/hiring-employees

If you have more specific questions on this matter, we recommend speaking with a tax professional.

If you have any other questions, please reach out to your Baron Financial Group team.

 

 

Medicare Webinar: Prepare for the 2018 Medicare Open Enrollment – Oct. 15th – Dec. 7th, 2017

Medicare is health insurance for individuals who are 65 and older, under 65 with certain disabilities, or those who have End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD).

The 2018 Medicare annual open enrollment period will begin on Oct. 15, 2017 and run through December 7, 2017. Baron Financial Group’s informative webinar, presented by independent Medicare Consultant Mary Jean Cullen (MedicareAssist, LLC), discusses how Medicare works and what you need to know prior and during your Medicare years. This presentation was first held at the September 13, 2016 Wine & Wealth event for Baron Financial Group clients.

You can learn more at Medicare.gov, the official U.S. Government site for Medicare.

If you have any further questions, please don’t hesitate to contact the Baron Financial Group team.