Is Pet Insurance Right for You and Your Furry Friend?

A 60-second read by Victor Cannillo:  For many of us, our four-legged companions have become a part of our families. Perhaps you have thought about whether pet insurance is something you should consider for your pet, but don’t know much about it.

Below we outline a brief summary of pet insurance to help you determine whether it might be right for you and your furry friend.

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Do You Have a Will? 3 Basic Estate Planning Documents You Should Have

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published January 16, 2017. The information is still current as of this date.

A 60-second read by Victor Cannillo:  If you haven’t completed your estate planning documents yet, consider making it a priority. Having your estate planning documents in place can help to prevent issues down the road and ensures that your specific wants and wishes will be carried out. For example, did you know that technically, everyone has a will? The question is do you have a personalized will or the standard state version?

Here are the 3 most basic estate documents you should have:

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Things to Consider If You Have Over-Contributed to an IRA

A 60-second read by Victor Cannillo:

#1 – We highly recommend you hire a Certified Public Accountant to help you resolve the issue.

Here are some points to consider:

  • There are limitations on the total amount that may be contributed to an IRA. Currently, it’s the greater of either $5,500 ($6,500 if the person is 50 or older) or your taxable compensation for the year.

  • The IRS considers each individual person to have a single IRA.  The maximum contribution limits apply to all of your IRA accounts.  If you have more than one IRA account open, you can contribute to one account or all of your accounts as long as the total contributions meet the yearly limit.

  • If there are excess contributions to your IRAs, there is an annual additional 6% tax penalty (paid with the filing of Form 5329) on those excess contributions until you withdraw them from your account.

  • Normally, if the excess contribution for the tax year is withdrawn with any related earnings before the tax return deadline (including extensions), you are not subject to the 6% additional tax. Also the earnings on the excess IRA contributions as determined by the custodian will be subject to tax for the year the excess contribution was made. Those earnings are also subject to a 10% early withdrawal penalty if the person’s age is under 59 and a half for the year of the contribution.

  • You will need to consult a Certified Public Accountant to determine what tax returns need to be filed.

If you have more specific questions on this matter, we recommend speaking with a tax professional.

For any other questions, please reach out to your Baron Team.

Keeping Your Portfolio “Balanced”

A 60-second read by Victor Cannillo:  If your goal is to invest over the long-term, totally avoiding a sector solely on the basis that it has recently performed well would not be prudent.  Long-term investors should identify a globally-diversified strategy, spread across many sectors, that is risk appropriate and helps them achieve their goals.  

At Baron, our objective is to find the appropriate balance of globally-diversified assets for our clients’ portfolio, while producing as little volatility as possible to achieve their desired results. Using a rebalancing strategy can help smooth out volatility in the portfolio and prevent overweighting to any one sector or asset class while still allowing the investor to remain invested.

A rebalancing strategy aims to divest the relative gains from strong-performing asset classes and invest the proceeds in non-correlated asset classes that may be underperforming at the present time. By purchasing securities within sectors that may be trading at severe discounts due to their lackluster recent performance, our clients can both reap the reward of the recent market surge, while simultaneously strengthening the long-term stability of their portfolio. Furthermore, if the sectors that have been performing well recently were to take a severe and unexpected downturn, a rebalancing strategy would look to assure that the portfolio is not overinvested in those asset classes and exposed to an unwarranted amount of risk at any given time.

For any questions on your portfolio, please don’t hesitate to contact your Baron Team

 

What documents are safe to shred? What must I keep?

A 30-second read by Victor Cannillo: Whether you are tired of piles of papers cluttering up your home or are trying to go “paperless,” it is important to know what documents you should keep and which you could shred.

Below we list some of the important documents the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) suggests that you should always keep:

  • Birth certificates/ adoption documents
  • Social Security cards
  • Marriage licenses or divorce decrees
  • Tax returns
  • Passports or citizenship materials
  • Familial death certificates
  • For items like your home and car, you want to hold on to any automobile titles and home deeds for as long as they are in your ownership.
  • To see more, click here.

Shredding Timeline-The FTC recommends that you wait:

  • 7 years before shredding any tax-related receipts and cancelled checks.
  • 1 year before shredding bank statements, medical bills, etc.

Items such as credit card statements can be shredded right away once paid. To help reduce capital gains tax, retain home improvement receipts until your home is sold.

To view the FTC’s safe shredding timeline infographic, click here.

In addition to decluttering your home, shredding documents with personal information can help prevent identity theft.  Just remember to keep the listed documents above for the suggested amount of time.

Feel free to reach out to us for any other questions.