New Investor Blog Series from BFG – IRA Basics

Baron Financial Group’s New Investor Blog Series will consist of monthly blog posts that provide general information on a range of investment topics. The series aims to provide new investors with basic investment information.

*This blog post is the first in the series*

 A 60-second read by the Baron Team:  What is an IRA? An IRA is an Individual Retirement Account. There are two types of IRAs – Traditional and Roth. 

Traditional IRA:

  • Who is eligible? Anyone can invest in an IRA if they are under the age of 70 ½ and are still working
  • How much can you contribute? For 2019, you can contribute up to $6,000 per year based on your earned income (or $7,000 if you are over the age of 50)
  • What are the tax implications? Investment income and growth is tax-deferred until you begin to make withdrawals
  • Are contributions tax-deductible? Yes (In most Cases)
  • Are there withdrawal penalties? Yes, withdrawals made before age 59 ½ are subject to a 10% penalty (There are exceptions)
  • What are the distribution rules? Withdrawal is mandatory starting at age 70 ½

Roth IRA:

  • Who is eligible? Working taxpayers with gross income below $137,00  or $203,000 for married couples for 2019 tax year (Phaseouts apply)
  • How much can you contribute? For 2019, you can contribute up to $6,000 per year based on your earned income (or $7,000 if you are over the age of 50)
  • What are the tax implications? With Roth IRAs you pay taxes upfront, so withdrawals made upon retirement are tax-free
  • Are contributions tax deductible? No
  • Are there withdrawal penalties? None, if a qualified distribution
  • What are the distribution rules? No requirement to make withdrawals by age 70 ½

What are the main differences between the two?

Continue reading “New Investor Blog Series from BFG – IRA Basics”

Important Update Regarding Freezing Your Credit

A 30-second read by the Baron Team: This is an update to our September 2017 blog post concerning the Equifax data breach that occurred in September of 2017.  Due to the data breach, we advised considering freezing your credit reports to stop thieves from opening new credit cards or loans in your name. Freezing your report also prevents you from opening new accounts, so each time you apply for a credit card, mortgage or loan, you need to lift the freeze a few days beforehand. 

Now, you can freeze and unfreeze your credit at the three major credit bureaus for free, thanks to a new federal law that took effect on September 21, 2018.

In addition, the law extends the length of time a fraud alert remains on your credit report to one year, from the previous period of 90 days.

You will need to contact all three credit bureaus to place a freeze on your credit report:

For more information regarding credit reports and identity theft, read our Equifax data breach post.

Please contact your Baron team with any questions.  

Nanny Tax: What You Need to Know When You Hire a Household Employee

A 60-second read by the Baron Team: 

  • Nanny taxes are taxes paid to the government from a person working in and/or around your home. These jobs can include nanny, housekeeper, gardener, chef, personal assistant or caregiver.
  • The worker is considered a household employee if the employer controls what work is done and how it is done and can be full time or part time work.
  • If you pay someone that works in your home $2,100 or more a year or $1,000 in a quarter they are considered a household employee.
  • The employer must obtain the employee’s name and social security number.
  • The employer must withhold a certain amount of compensation from a household employee for FICA and Medicare.
  • As well as withholding a certain amount of money from your household employee, you must also pay your share of FICA employer taxes and federal and state unemployment taxes.
  • The employee, as well as the employer, can benefit from filing these taxes. The employee can prove she/he was working for a set amount of time and qualify for certain government benefits, such as social security and unemployment.

  • Forms Required to file:
    1. Form SS-4 to obtain your federal Employer Identification Number, which is needed for the other forms.
    2. Form I-9 is needed to be filled out by your employee to verify she/he is eligible to work in the United States.
    3. W-4 Forms are used to determine what taxes are needed to be deducted from the household employee’s wages and sent to the IRS.
    4. Schedule H Form is part of your personal return with Form 1040 & an accountant can help determine the amount the employer is taxed for FICA and unemployment.

  • Insurance requirements:
    1. You must register for unemployment insurance in your residing state.
    2. You also need to have workers compensation insurance, which is very important.
      • If you reside in NY, you will also need to purchase a separate disability policy.

  • State taxes are generally paid quarterly while Federal taxes are paid annually.
  • If you refuse to file the proper tax documents you may be subjected to an audit from the IRS leading to tax evasion. Trying to classify your household employee as an “independent contractor” is a red flag to the IRS and should be avoided.

For more information on hiring household employees visit:  https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/hiring-household-employees

For more information on what forms are needed for hiring employees visit: https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/hiring-employees

If you have more specific questions on this matter, we recommend speaking with a tax professional.

If you have any other questions, please reach out to your Baron Financial Group team.

 

 

Things to Consider If You Have Over-Contributed to an IRA

A 60-second read by Victor Cannillo:

#1 – We highly recommend you hire a Certified Public Accountant to help you resolve the issue.

Here are some points to consider:

  • There are limitations on the total amount that may be contributed to an IRA. Currently, it’s the greater of either $5,500 ($6,500 if the person is 50 or older) or your taxable compensation for the year.

  • The IRS considers each individual person to have a single IRA.  The maximum contribution limits apply to all of your IRA accounts.  If you have more than one IRA account open, you can contribute to one account or all of your accounts as long as the total contributions meet the yearly limit.

  • If there are excess contributions to your IRAs, there is an annual additional 6% tax penalty (paid with the filing of Form 5329) on those excess contributions until you withdraw them from your account.

  • Normally, if the excess contribution for the tax year is withdrawn with any related earnings before the tax return deadline (including extensions), you are not subject to the 6% additional tax. Also the earnings on the excess IRA contributions as determined by the custodian will be subject to tax for the year the excess contribution was made. Those earnings are also subject to a 10% early withdrawal penalty if the person’s age is under 59 and a half for the year of the contribution.

  • You will need to consult a Certified Public Accountant to determine what tax returns need to be filed.

If you have more specific questions on this matter, we recommend speaking with a tax professional.

For any other questions, please reach out to your Baron Team.