Category Archives: Retirement Planning

Keeping Your Portfolio “Balanced”

A 60-second read by Victor Cannillo:  If your goal is to invest over the long-term, totally avoiding a sector solely on the basis that it has recently performed well would not be prudent.  Long-term investors should identify a globally-diversified strategy, spread across many sectors, that is risk appropriate and helps them achieve their goals.  

At Baron, our objective is to find the appropriate balance of globally-diversified assets for our clients’ portfolio, while producing as little volatility as possible to achieve their desired results. Using a rebalancing strategy can help smooth out volatility in the portfolio and prevent overweighting to any one sector or asset class while still allowing the investor to remain invested.

A rebalancing strategy aims to divest the relative gains from strong-performing asset classes and invest the proceeds in non-correlated asset classes that may be underperforming at the present time. By purchasing securities within sectors that may be trading at severe discounts due to their lackluster recent performance, our clients can both reap the reward of the recent market surge, while simultaneously strengthening the long-term stability of their portfolio. Furthermore, if the sectors that have been performing well recently were to take a severe and unexpected downturn, a rebalancing strategy would look to assure that the portfolio is not overinvested in those asset classes and exposed to an unwarranted amount of risk at any given time.

For any questions on your portfolio, please don’t hesitate to contact your Baron Team

 

Converting your IRA to a Roth IRA – What to Know

A 60-second read by Nicholas Scheibner:  The main difference between a Traditional Individual Retirement Account (IRA) and a Roth IRA is that with a Roth IRA, you pay taxes upfront, so that when you are in retirement, you can make withdrawals tax-free.

If you are considering converting your IRA to a Roth, here are a few things to consider:

Taxes: If you convert money from a traditional IRA to a Roth, your tax rate for the year you convert could go up.  If you decide to explore the conversion, please review with your accountant when to convert, as ideally, you would want to convert in a year that you expect your taxes to be lower.

RMDs: If you do decide to convert, this does provide a greater tax diversification to your overall portfolio, since you will potentially be reducing the required minimum distribution (RMD) amount from your IRA by converting IRA assets to Roth IRA assets.

The financial breakeven: The financial breakeven for a Roth is different for everyone, however, there are some general principles for the calculation – If tax rates increase in the future, this conversion may be worth more. If tax rates stay the same, or go lower, there may be less of a benefit. You may want to consider the opportunity cost of investing all monies today as opposed to using a portion for taxes.  The longer you live the more you may benefit from having the Roth assets grow tax-free.

Please review this information with your accountant and consult with your financial planner prior to converting.

For any further questions, please reach out to your Baron team.

What Does Working with a Fee-Only Advisor Mean for You?

An Advisor who is compensated by only YOU, the client:

Working with a Fee-Only advisor means that the advisor is only compensated by the fee that they charge, not by any commissions. The fee could be charged hourly, or it could be calculated as a percentage of a client’s assets under management (AUM), or even a retainer model. The National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAFPA) is the country’s leading professional association of Fee-Only financial advisors and they define a Fee-Only financial advisor as “one who is compensated solely by the client with neither the advisor nor any related party receiving compensation that is contingent on the purchase or sale of a financial product.” 

Working with a Fee-Only advisor means that the advice you receive is not motivated by the need to sell any products or influence from outside interests. The advice is objective and tailored to meet your specific needs.

An Advisor who works in YOUR Best Interest:

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Treasury Ends myRA Retirement Savings Program

A 30-second read by Victoria Cannillo: In a previous post, we provided an overview of myRA, a retirement savings option, backed by the U.S. Treasury, for those who didn’t have access to an employer-sponsored retirement savings plan. The program was introduced in 2014 to enable participants to contribute to a retirement plan with flexible contribution amounts and no fees to open an account. The Treasury Department has recently announced that the myRA program will no longer continue, stating the demand for the program did not warrant the expense.

On the myRA website it states, “The U.S. Department of the Treasury has decided to phase out the myRA® retirement savings program and the program is no longer accepting new enrollments…” According to a July 28, 2017 article in The New York Times by reporter Tara Siegel Bernard, in the few years that the program was in existence, there were roughly thirty thousand participants. Participants of the program have the opportunity to rollover the savings that they accumulated through myRA into a Roth IRA. The myRA website provides participants information about selecting a new Roth IRA provider so that they can continue saving.

Please reach out to your Baron Team for any further questions.

Dealing with Market Volatility – A Long-Term Perspective Helps Manage Short-Term Actions

A 60-second read by Anthony Benante: If staying up-to-date on market events is a part of your regular routine, that is fine, but remember that volatility is a constant factor when it comes to investing. It’s best to have a plan established before you invest, so that you know what to do when markets make unexpected short-term moves.  For the assets you are investing for the long-term, the day-to-day fluctuations you experience now may not seem as significant over time. However, there are actions you want to take. 

At Baron Financial Group, we review our investment choices versus peer investments, to determine if any individual investment choices need to be changed.  Also, we review client portfolios versus their specific long-term strategy and rebalance them if needed.  These actions are part of working towards our main objective, which is to help our clients achieve their financial goals.  Volatile markets are incorporated in our financial plans for clients and we keep clients informed about their chances for achieving those goals in different market environments.  This helps give our clients a clear perspective of where they stand and what it will take to achieve their long-term financial goals, even after incorporating recent market moves.

As always, if you have any further questions, don’t hesitate to contact the Baron Financial Group team.

 

Should politics affect your decision to include international investments in your portfolio?

A 45-second read by Anthony Benante:  For your specific portfolio, you need to evaluate your ability and willingness to take risk to help determine your personal profile. Without knowing about your entire financial situation, we would not make a specific recommendation for any asset. Typically, including globally-diversified assets in your investment strategy offers statistical benefits. We encourage you to think about the long-term nature of investing and validate your investment strategy with a comprehensive financial plan.  The plan should show outcomes based on different market environments and cycles.

Given the expectation that you could live into your 90s, it would probably not be best to look at your portfolio through a political lens.  In the short-term, breaking news is constantly occurring and it would be difficult to react correctly to each new development as it relates to your investments.  Over the long-term, there is the possibility for change in political parties and history suggests that the political party in charge in the United States has little impact on long-term market performance.  The decision to include international investments should not be directed by current political situations, but rather based on which investment strategy can help you achieve long-term success.

Reach out to our Baron team if you have any questions…

An Overview of myRA

Editor’s Note: As of July, 2017, the Treasury Department has announced that the myRA program will no longer continue.  For more information,  read our update to this post.

A 45-second read by Victoria Cannillo: You have most likely heard of a Roth IRA or a Traditional IRA, but what about myRA? myRA was introduced in 2014 as an option for people who don’t have access to an employer-sponsored retirement savings plan or other retirement savings options. According to the myRA website, you can contribute up to $5,500/year into the account ($6,500/year for those older than 50). Once the account reaches an account balance of $15,000, or when the account is 30 years old, the savings will be transferred or rolled-over into a private-sector Roth IRA.

For 2016, the maximum income allowable to participate in the program was $132,000 for single-tax filers and $193,000 for couples filing together. Read more specifics about the program, here.

Some pros and cons of myRA to consider:

Pros:

  • No cost to open an account and no fees
  • Flexible contribution amounts (a traditional IRA has a $1,000 minimum)
  • Investments are backed by the United States Treasury
  • Tax benefits are similar to a Roth IRA, such as earning interest tax-free

Cons:

  • There is only one investment option – a treasury bond (accounts are invested solely in Government Savings Bonds)
  • Once the account balance reaches $15,000, it stops accumulating interest, so your maximum for savings is limited
  • Doesn’t seem to offer many long-term options at this time

Reach out to your Baron team if you want help in understanding what kind of IRA would be best for you.

What is the best way to plan for your assets to remain within your bloodlines?

A 60-second read by Nicholas Scheibner:  When planning your estate, it is important to divide all of your accounts into two groups:  accounts with designated beneficiaries and accounts with no designated beneficiaries.  Examples of accounts with designated beneficiaries are 401(k)s, IRAs, transfer of death (TOD) accounts, and other retirement accounts. The designated beneficiary on an account bypasses your will.  For example, if your will states that all of your money is to pass on to your child, but your 401(k) primary beneficiary is an ex-spouse, your ex-spouse will inherit the money from your 401(k).  It is crucial that you review your beneficiaries on your accounts to make sure they agree with your desires.

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Class of 2017: It Isn’t Too Early to Start Thinking about Your Retirement

A 60-second read by the Baron Team:  Congratulations 2017 college graduates! Throw that mortarboard as high in the air as you can and before it circles back down to earth, start thinking about saving for your retirement. You are most likely going to be responsible for setting yourself up for a successful retirement, so your best bet is to invest early and often.

Invest in yourself first. Most people think investing is the key to wealth, but while certainly important, you have to have some money first to invest. So as soon as you begin your first job out of school, start saving as much as you can for retirement.

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Not all CDs are the same…

A 90-second read by Anthony Benante: When investing in a Certificate of Deposit (CD), you may have more options than you think.  You can purchase a CD at a local bank or you can purchase CDs in your investment accounts (such as a taxable account, IRA or Roth IRA, etc.).  These are typically known as Brokered CDs.  Even though the CDs you get from the bank and the CDs in your investment accounts are called Certificates of Deposit, you should know that there are differences.  In either case, we would recommend that the CDs you invest in are fully covered by FDIC insurance.  If you would like to learn more about FDIC insurance coverage, feel free to ask us or you can go online to www.fdic.gov.

Purchasing CDs from your local bank: If you were to purchase a CD from a local bank that is FDIC insured, you would receive interest and would get your principal investment at maturity. If you receive regular statements, the value of your CD would most likely never change because it is not tradeable.  If for some reason you wanted access to your funds prior to maturity, you would most likely be subject to a penalty, such as 90 days’ worth of interest (but this should be verified individually). Other factors to consider are that local banks can offer “teaser rates” (rates higher than the market) for CDs to attract deposits, but those rates may not be available after your CD matures.  Unless you want to consistently move your money from institution to institution, using time and effort, you will be subject to the rates being offered only by your bank.

Continue reading Not all CDs are the same…